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The Moonstone, Chapter 7 pt1

CHAPTER VII While I was in this bewildered frame of mind, sorely needing a little quiet time by myself to put me right again, my daughter Penelope got in my way (just as her late mother used to get in my way on the stairs), and instantly summoned me to tell her all that had passed at the conference between Mr. Franklin and me. Under present circumstances, the one thing to be done was to clap the extinguisher upon Penelope's curiosity on the spot. I accordingly replied that Mr. Franklin and I had both talked of foreign politics, till we could talk no longer, and had then mutually fallen asleep...
Language: EN | Submitted 2 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 7 pt4

Chapter 7, part 4 The night was still and close, and the moon was at the full in the heavens. It was so silent out of doors, that I heard from time to time, very faint and low, the fall of the sea, as the ground-swell heaved it in on the sand-bank near the mouth of our little bay. As the house stood, the terrace side was the dark side; but the broad moonlight showed fair on the gravel walk that ran along the next side to the terrace. Looking this way, after looking up at the sky, I saw the shadow of a person in the moonlight thrown forward from behind the corner of the house. Being old and ...
Language: EN | Submitted 3 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 7 pt3

Chapter 7, part 3 How the meeting between Mr. Franklin and his aunt and cousin went off, is more than I can tell you. I would have given something to have waited at table that day. But, in my position in the household, waiting at dinner (except on high family festivals) was letting down my dignity in the eyes of the other servants--a thing which my lady considered me quite prone enough to do already, without seeking occasions for it. The news brought to me from the upper regions, that evening, came from Penelope and the footman. Penelope mentioned that she had never known Miss Rachel so par...
Language: EN | Submitted 3 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 7 pt2

Chapter 7, part 2 She had been surprised again, crying and looking at her deformed shoulder in the glass. Had she and Mr. Franklin known anything of each other before today? Quite impossible! Had they heard anything of each other? Impossible again! I could speak to Mr. Franklin's astonishment as genuine, when he saw how the girl stared at him. Penelope could speak to the girl's inquisitiveness as genuine, when she asked questions about Mr. Franklin. The conference between us, conducted in this way, was tiresome enough, until my daughter suddenly ended it by bursting out with what I thought th...
Language: EN | Submitted 3 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 6 pt10

Chapter 6, part 10 He had his French side, and his German side, and his Italian side--the original English foundation showing through, every now and then, as much as to say, "Here I am, sorely transmogrified, as you see, but there's something of me left at the bottom of him still." Miss Rachel used to remark that the Italian side of him was uppermost, on those occasions when he unexpectedly gave in, and asked you in his nice sweet-tempered way to take his own responsibilities on your shoulders. You will do him no injustice, I think, if you conclude that the Italian side of him was uppermost n...
Language: EN | Submitted 3 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 6 pt9

Chapter 6, part 9 "That's the Subjective view," says Mr. Franklin. "It does you great credit, Betteredge, to be able to take the Subjective view. But there's another mystery about the Colonel's legacy which is not accounted for yet. How are we to explain his only giving Rachel her birthday present conditionally on her mother being alive?" "I don't want to slander a dead man, sir," I answered. "But if he has purposely left a legacy of trouble and danger to his sister, by the means of her child, it must be a legacy made conditional on his sister's being alive to feel the vexation of it." "Oh...
Language: EN | Submitted 3 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 6 pt8

Chapter 6, part 8 More words followed these, providing if my lady was dead, or if Miss Rachel was dead, at the time of the testator's decease, for the Diamond being sent to Holland, in accordance with the sealed instructions originally deposited with it. The proceeds of the sale were, in that case, to be added to the money already left by the Will for the professorship of chemistry at the university in the north. I handed the paper back to Mr. Franklin, sorely troubled what to say to him. Up to that moment, my own opinion had been (as you know) that the Colonel had died as wickedly as he had...
Language: EN | Submitted 3 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 6 pt7

Chapter 6, part 7 It's curious to note, when your mind's anxious, how very far in the way of relief a very small joke will go. We found a fund of merriment, at the time, in the notion of making away with Miss Rachel's lawful property, and getting Mr. Blake, as executor, into dreadful trouble--though where the merriment was, I am quite at a loss to discover now. Mr. Franklin was the first to bring the talk back to the talk's proper purpose. He took an envelope out of his pocket, opened it, and handed to me the paper inside. "Betteredge," he said, "we must face the question of the Colonel's m...
Language: EN | Submitted 3 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 6 pt6

Chapter 6, part 6 I began to see my lady and Miss Rachel at the end of it all, now. Not a word he said escaped me. "I was not very willing, when I discovered the story of the Moonstone," said Mr. Franklin, "to be the means of bringing it here. But Mr. Bruff reminded me that somebody must put my cousin's legacy into my cousin's hands--and that I might as well do it as anybody else. After taking the Diamond out of the bank, I fancied I was followed in the streets by a shabby, dark-complexioned man. I went to my father's house to pick up my luggage, and found a letter there, which unexpectedly ...
Language: EN | Submitted 3 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 6 pt5

Chapter 6, part 5 "Remark," says Mr. Franklin, "that the integrity of the Diamond, as a whole stone, is here artfully made dependent on the preservation from violence of the Colonel's life. He is not satisfied with saying to the enemies he dreads, 'Kill me--and you will be no nearer to the Diamond than you are now; it is where you can't get at it--in the guarded strongroom of a bank.' He says instead, 'Kill me--and the Diamond will be the Diamond no longer; its identity will be destroyed.' What does that mean?" Here I had (as I thought) a flash of the wonderful foreign brightness. "I know,"...
Language: EN | Submitted 3 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 6 pt4

Chapter 6, part 4 "He not only gave the reason--he had the reason written in his will," said Mr. Franklin. "I have got an extract, which you shall see presently. Don't be slovenly-minded, Betteredge! One thing at a time. You have heard about the Colonel's Will; now you must hear what happened after the Colonel's death. It was formally necessary to have the Diamond valued, before the Will could be proved. All the jewellers consulted, at once confirmed the Colonel's assertion that he possessed one of the largest diamonds in the world. The question of accurately valuing it presented some serious...
Language: EN | Submitted 3 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 6 pt3

Chapter 6, part 3 "Let's finish the story of the Colonel first," says Mr. Franklin. "There is a curious want of system, Betteredge, in the English mind; and your question, my old friend, is an instance of it. When we are not occupied in making machinery, we are (mentally speaking) the most slovenly people in the universe." "So much," I thought to myself, "for a foreign education! He has learned that way of girding at us in France, I suppose." Mr. Franklin took up the lost thread, and went on. "My father," he said, "got the papers he wanted, and never saw his brother-in-law again from that ...
Language: EN | Submitted 3 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 6 pt2

Chapter 6, part 2 He might deposit the precious stone in any place especially guarded and set apart--like a banker's or jeweller's strongroom--for the safe custody of valuables of high price. His main personal responsibility in the matter was to be of the passive kind. He was to undertake either by himself, or by a trustworthy representative--to receive at a prearranged address, on certain prearranged days in every year, a note from the Colonel, simply stating the fact that he was a living man at that date. In the event of the date passing over without the note being received, the Colonel's s...
Language: EN | Submitted 3 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 6 pt1

CHAPTER VI Keeping my private sentiments to myself, I respectfully requested Mr. Franklin to go on. Mr. Franklin replied, "Don't fidget, Betteredge," and went on. Our young gentleman's first words informed me that his discoveries, concerning the wicked Colonel and the Diamond, had begun with a visit which he had paid (before he came to us) to the family lawyer, at Hampstead. A chance word dropped by Mr. Franklin, when the two were alone, one day, after dinner, revealed that he had been charged by his father with a birthday present to be taken to Miss Rachel. One thing led to another; and it ...
Language: EN | Submitted 3 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 5 pt6

Chapter five part six "No, sir," I said. "My looks, on this occasion at any rate, tell the truth." "In that case," says Mr. Franklin, "suppose I put you up to my point of view, before we go any further. I see three very serious questions involved in the Colonel's birthday-gift to my cousin Rachel. Follow me carefully, Betteredge; and count me off on your fingers, if it will help you," says Mr. Franklin, with a certain pleasure in showing how clear-headed he could be, which reminded me wonderfully of old times when he was a boy. "Question the first: Was the Colonel's Diamond the object of a ...
Language: EN | Submitted 7 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 5 pt5

Chapter five part five My lady had a dash--no more--of the family temper. "Tell Colonel Herncastle," she said, when I gave her her brother's message, "that Miss Verinder is engaged, and that I decline to see him." I tried to plead for a civiller answer than that; knowing the Colonel's constitutional superiority to the restraints which govern gentlemen in general. Quite useless! The family temper flashed out at me directly. "When I want your advice," says my lady, "you know that I always ask for it. I don't ask for it now." I went downstairs with the message, of which I took the liberty of pre...
Language: EN | Submitted 7 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 5 pt4

Chapter five part four There was perhaps a grain of truth mixed up with this last report. It was false to say that he was afraid; but it was a fact that his life had been twice threatened in India; and it was firmly believed that the Moonstone was at the bottom of it. When he came back to England, and found himself avoided by everybody, the Moonstone was thought to be at the bottom of it again. The mystery of the Colonel's life got in the Colonel's way, and outlawed him, as you may say, among his own people. The men wouldn't let him into their clubs; the women--more than one--whom he wanted t...
Language: EN | Submitted 7 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 5 pt3

Chapter five part three Here follows the substance of what I said, written out entirely for your benefit. Pay attention to it, or you will be all abroad, when we get deeper into the story. Clear your mind of the children, or the dinner, or the new bonnet, or what not. Try if you can't forget politics, horses, prices in the City, and grievances at the club. I hope you won't take this freedom on my part amiss; it's only a way I have of appealing to the gentle reader. Lord! haven't I seen you with the greatest authors in your hands, and don't I know how ready your attention is to wander when it'...
Language: EN | Submitted 7 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 5 pt2

Chapter five part two "The late Mrs. Betteredge possessed a good many defects, sir," says I. "One of them (if you will pardon my mentioning it) was never keeping to the matter in hand. She was more like a fly than a woman: she couldn't settle on anything." "She would just have suited me," says Mr. Franklin. "I never settle on anything either. Betteredge, your edge is better than ever. Your daughter said as much, when I asked for particulars about the jugglers. 'Father will tell you, sir. He's a wonderful man for his age; and he expresses himself beautifully.' Penelope's own words--blushing ...
Language: EN | Submitted 7 days ago by Reticent Soup
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The Moonstone, Chapter 5 pt1

CHAPTER V The first thing I did, after we were left together alone, was to make a third attempt to get up from my seat on the sand. Mr. Franklin stopped me. "There is one advantage about this horrid place," he said; "we have got it all to ourselves. Stay where you are, Betteredge; I have something to say to you." While he was speaking, I was looking at him, and trying to see something of the boy I remembered, in the man before me. The man put me out. Look as I might, I could see no more of his boy's rosy cheeks than of his boy's trim little jacket. His complexion had got pale: his face, at ...
Language: EN | Submitted 7 days ago by Reticent Soup
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