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The Keystone keyboard powers your typing or gaming with built-in A.I.

07/22/2019 09:39:07 | Views: 173


Article of www.digitaltrends.com: Earlier this week, peripheral manufacturer Input Club launched a Kickstarter project for a mechanical keyboard that features a built-in artificial intelligence that adapts its response to typists’ behavior. The new offering, known as the Keystone, is compatible with Windows, MacOS, and Linux devices, and uses the A.I. in its firmware to learn from consumers’ unique typing habits and adjust the responsiveness of each key to improve the accuracy of the keyboard overall.

The Keystone keyboard powers your typing or gaming with built-in A.I.

The Keystone keyboard relies on the magnetic actuation register mechanisms under the keys to measure the per-key actuation point patterns that typists generate by using it. Because keypresses are actuated magnetically, the peripheral is able to measure the force, or even simply the distance, of a key depression by measuring the change in the relative strength of the magnetic field. Once the keyboard has been used for “a few hundred presses,” it is able to analyze the collected data and start making actuation point adjustments to accommodate typist-specific quirks like using more force with certain fingers.

In their Kickstarter pitch video, Input Club notes that the Keystone is intended for more than just simple word processing, but is versatile enough to improve the workflow for creative work like audio or visual editing, and even for the traditional stronghold of mechanical keyboards, gaming. The Keystone will debut with companion management software called “HID-IO” which will allow consumers to set hotkeys. Specifically, Input Club touts the combination of this HID-IO feature with the hardware’s ability to register half-presses (i.e. a lower actuation force threshold on a key) to map key combinations to half-presses. The launch video also showcased dynamic brush size adjustment in a visual editor, in which the degree of key depression changed the brush size on a sliding scale as the key was gradually pushed and released.


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